Posts Tagged ‘Maggie O’Farrell’

Zoe Ball TV Book Club books

June 15, 2018

If you would like to join in with Zoe’s Book Club we have all ten of the fantastic books selected in stock.

This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay

The often hilarious, at times horrifying and occasionally heartbreaking diaries of a former junior doctor, and the story of why he decided to hang up his stethoscope.

Never Greener by Ruth Jones

In her unmissable debut, actress and screenwriter Ruth Jones shows us the dangers of trying to recapture that which was once lost and failing to realise the beauty of what we already have.

The Silent Companions: a ghost story by Laura Purcell

Some doors are locked for a reason… Newly married, newly widowed Elsie is sent to see out her pregnancy at her late husband’s crumbling country estate, The Bridge. With her new servants resentful and the local villagers actively hostile, Elsie only has her husband’s awkward cousin for company. Or so she thinks.

Killer Intent by Tony Kent

Britain’s elite security forces seem powerless when an audacious attempt is made to assassinate a former US president in London. This becomes the spark which ignites a chain reaction of explosive events that will see old political sympathies rekindled and personal loyalties betrayed.

The Sealwoman’s Gift by Sally Magnusson

In 1627 Barbary pirates raided the coast of Iceland and abducted some 400 of its people, including 250 from a tiny island off the mainland. Among the captives sold into slavery in Algiers were the island pastor, his wife and their three children. Although the raid itself is well documented, little is known about what happened to the women and children afterwards.

Dark Pines: A Tuva Moodyson Mystery by Will Dean

Five villagers. Six hundred square kilometres of Swedish forest. One reporter. Two bodies… ̀Will Dean’s atmospheric crime thriller marks him out as a talent to watch. Dark Pines is stylish, compelling and as chilling as a Swedish winter.

I am, I am, I am: seventeen brushes with death by Maggie O’Farrell

I AM, I AM, I AM is a memoir with a difference – the unputdownable story of an extraordinary woman’s life in near-death experiences. Insightful, inspirational, intelligent, it is a book to be read at a sitting, a story you finish newly conscious of life’s fragility, determined to make every heartbeat count.

The Man I think I know by Mike Gayle

Some people just look destined for great things. And sometimes, life has other ideas. A powerful and bittersweet story of an unexpected male friendship and an unlikely love story, this uplifting tale reminds us of the simple courage at the heart of every human being.

The Summer of Impossible Things by Rowan Coleman

If you could change the past, would you? How far would you go to save the person you love? Luna is about to do everything she can to save her mother’s life. Even if it means sacrificing her own. A beautiful novel about family, courage, sacrifice and love in all its guises from the Sunday Times bestselling author of The Memory Book.

Necessary Evil by Abir Mukherjee

The fabulously wealthy kingdom of Sambalpore is home to tigers, elephants, diamond mines and the beautiful Palace of the Sun. But when the heir to the throne is assassinated in the presence of Captain Sam Wyndham and Sergeant ‘Surrender-Not’ Banerjee, they discover a kingdom riven with suppressed conflict.

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The Wellcome Book Prize Longlist 2018 📚

March 5, 2018

The Wellcome Prize is sponsored by the Wellcome Trust and celebrates the best new fiction and non-fiction on the themes of health, illness, and medicine. This year’s longlisted titles cover subjects such as infertility; human behaviour; Alzheimer’s; a bestselling author’s memoir of her brushes with death, and the story of how Joseph Lister changed medicine forever.

We have the following titles from the long list available to borrow from your local library…

Stay with me by Ayobami Adebayo

Yejide is hoping for a miracle, for a child. It is all her husband wants, all her mother-in-law wants, and she has tried everything. But when her relatives insist upon a new wife, it is too much for Yejide to bear. Unravelling against the social and political turbulence of 1980s Nigeria, Stay With Me is a story of the fragility of married love, the undoing of family, the power of grief, and the all-consuming bonds of motherhood. It is a tale about the desperate attempts we make to save ourselves, and those we love, from heartbreak.

The Butchering Art by Lindsey Fitzharris

In The Butchering Art, historian Lindsey Fitzharris recreates a critical turning point in the history of medicine, when Joseph Lister transformed surgery from a brutal, harrowing practice to the safe, vaunted profession we know today.

Victorian operating theatres were known as ‘gateways of death’, Fitzharris reminds us, since half of those who underwent surgery didn’t survive the experience.

In Pursuit of Memory by Joseph Jebelli

In Pursuit of Memory zooms inside the human brain to see how Alzheimer’s works and out again to show, entwined with the history and science, a thrilling hunt for answers.

Jebelli’s compelling insider’s account shows vividly why he feels so hopeful about a cure but also why our best defence in the meantime is to understand the disease. In Pursuit of Memory is the definitive book on Alzheimer’s: its past, present and future.

With the End in Mind by Kathryn  Mannix

In this unprecedented book, palliative medicine pioneer Dr Kathryn Mannix explores the biggest taboo in our society and the only certainty we all share: death. Told through a series of beautifully crafted stories taken from nearly four decades of clinical practice, her book answers the most intimate questions about the process of dying with touching honesty and humanity.

Midwinter Break by Bernard MacLaverty

A retired couple, Gerry and Stella Gilmore, fly to Amsterdam for a midwinter break. A holiday to refresh the senses, to see the sights and to generally take stock of what remains of their lives. But amongst the wintry streets and icy canals, we see their relationship fracturing beneath the surface. And when memories re-emerge of a troubled time in their native Ireland things begin to fall apart.

I Am, I Am, I Am by Maggie O’Farrell

The unputdownable story of an extraordinary woman’s life in near-death experiences. Insightful, inspirational, intelligent, it is a book to be read at a sitting, a story you finish newly conscious of life’s fragility, determined to make every heartbeat count. A childhood illness she was not expected to survive. A teenage yearning to escape that nearly ended in disaster.

Behave by Robert M. Sapolsky

Behave is at once a dazzling tour and a majestic synthesis of the whole science of human behaviour. Brought to life through simple language, engaging stories and irreverent wit, it offers the fullest picture yet of the origins of tribalism and xenophobia, hierarchy and competition, morality and free will, war and peace.

The Vaccine Race by Meredith Wadman

Until the late 1960s, tens of thousands of children suffered crippling birth defects if their mothers had been exposed to rubella, popularly known as German measles, while pregnant. There was no vaccine and little understanding of how the disease devastated foetuses. In June 1962, a young biologist in Philadelphia produced the first safe, clean cells that made possible the mass-production of vaccines against many common childhood diseases. Two years later, in the midst of a German measles epidemic, his colleague developed the vaccine that would one day effectively wipe out rubella for good.